Lauryn Hill's Anti-Gay Lyrics? Just Say No

Monica Miller takes Lauryn Hill to task on BET.com for talking down to the LGBT community on her latest song, "Neurotic Society (Compulsory Mix)."

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Lauryn Hill (Kena Betancur/Getty Images)

Lauryn Hill is controversial and problematic, and not just to the Internal Revenue Service. The embattled former Fugee besmirches the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community in her newest song, "Neurotic Society (Compulsory Mix)," Monica Miller writes on BET.com. Miller says you can't purport to tear down one social injustice while perpetuating another.

Hill's new single "Neurotic Society (Compulsory Mix)" is a speedy song about a maladaptive society with enough punchiness to make you trip over your own political commitments. We love to love Lauryn for keeping us honest. But let's return the honesty. In an era where rappers are finally called out for their virulent words -- Lil' Wayne and Rick Ross being the latest to come under fire -- there's something about Hill's sexual politics that seem anything but revolutionary. Under the dizzying collection of prophetic sound bites, it appears that some of her metaphors and similes suggest that though she's on the front lines for racial and financial justice, she might not extend her concerns to gay and lesbian communities. 

"Neurotic Society" proclaims again that Babylon is falling -- thanks in part to tricksters like "girl men," "drag queens," and the lies of "social transvestism." Whether or not Hill is merely using these comments as examples of the smokescreens and sleight-of-hands that pervade this "Neurotic Society" is unclear. Beyond intention, these sorts of statements suggest that society is in a shambles because it's been taking too many cues from the LGBTQ community, acting like "girl men," "drag queens" and "transvestites." Is her beef with oppressive society or is her issue with people who don't abide by a traditional family structure? ...

Read Monica Miller's entire piece at BET.com.

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