Black Pastors to Star in Reality TV Show

Black America Web's Michael H. Cottman asks if pastors should sanctify the foolishness of reality TV in an insightful piece about an impending Oxygen Network reality show about, well, black pastors.

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Deitrick Haddon, one of the pastors to be featured on Oxygen Network's reality show (YouTube screen shot)

Black America Web's Michael H. Cottman asks in an insightful piece about an impending Oxygen Network reality show about black pastors: Should they sanctify the foolishness of reality TV?

Would you really want your pastor – and your congregation – to star in a reality television show?

I'm not knocking the six black pastors who have signed on for a new reality show on Oxygen called "Pastors of L.A." — a detailed look at the lives of men of God in Los Angeles.

But I do question why the pastors chose to participate in the show. Are they truly hoping to use the program to minister to those who need spiritual guidance? Or are they simply using the high-profile media platform to rake in more cash and bask in the spotlight of a national television audience?

"Pastors of L.A.' will give viewers a candid and revealing look at six boldly different and world renowned mega-pastors in Southern California, who are willing to share diverse aspects of their lives, from their work in the community and with their parishioners to the very large and sometimes provocative lives they lead away from the pulpit," says a press release from Oxygen.

Like many viewers, I'll watch the show with an open mind and see what revelations are presented and hope – and pray – that the show isn't a mess. Some say the concept of a show about black pastors is "madness" ...

"Pastors of LA" stars Bishop Noel Jones, Deitrick Haddon, Bishop Clarence McClendon, Pastor Wayne Chaney, Bishop Ron Gibson and Pastor Jay Haizlip as they manage money and drama from the pulpit.

Read Michael H. Cottman's entire blog entry at Black America Web.

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