How Corporate Hip-Hop Profits From Rape Culture

Clutch magazine's Kirsten West Savali says that "pimps masquerading as corporations" are proud stakeholders in the degradation and endangerment of women and must be held accountable.

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Chief Keef (AP/Interscope Records)

Clutch magazine's Kirsten West Savali says that "pimps masquerading as corporations" are proud stakeholders in the degradation and endangerment of women and must be held accountable.

When the laser sharp backlash finally grew too intense to ignore, Reebok severed ties with spokesperson Rick Ross for his failure to sincerely apologize for glorifying rape in the song "U.O.E.N.O."

That's the good news.

The bad news is that the fraternal twins of misogyny and violence are as necessary to corporate Hip-Hop's survival as Black men are to the Prison Industrial Complex -- and it didn't take long for Chicago rapper Chief Keef to grab the baton from Ross to ensure that it lived to see another day.

Conveniently leaking the lyrics to his latest song, "You," at the height of the Ross controversy -- no doubt to prove that he's "hard" and not intimidated by feminist wrath -- Chief Keef, born Keith Cozart, spit the following bars ...

Because Chief Keef is nothing but corporate Hip-Hop's latest poster boy, a generic figure interchangeable with many young Black men on the streets with mediocre talent, incessant bravado and dreams of stardom with no viable options in sight. He is a pawn about as pivotal to the eradication of entrenched rape culture in Hip-Hop as a minimum wage drive-thru worker at McDonald's is to reducing pink slime in their cheeseburgers.

Read Kirsten West Savali's entire piece at Clutch magazine.

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Kirsten West Savali is a cultural critic and senior writer for The Root, where she explores the intersections of race, gender, politics and pop culture. You can always find her where the good fight is—or good cookies. Follow her on Twitter.

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