Lessons: Boston and the Human Spirit

At the Huffington Post, Binta Niambi Brown shares excerpts from her correspondence to friends this week that reveal reasons to rejoice in humanity's endurance.

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Boston deals with aftermath of marathon explosions. (Darren McCollester)

At the Huffington Post, Binta Niambi Brown shares excerpts from her correspondence to friends this week that reveal reasons to rejoice in humanity's endurance.

Some have said this week that we are forever changed -- that Boston will never be the same again. Others have countered that saying, we will recover, that we are not changed by this singular set of tragedies. We will move on.

I'm beginning to think that's the point though. That in fact we are forever changed and changing, and not supposed to simply move on -- albeit not in the ways some would suggest or think. Every act of bravery, love, heroism -- it shows us what we can truly be as a people, it motivates more of us towards love and selflessness, not hate -- and isn't that the point of the quiet, but certain march of human progress and evolution? That we continue to grow into more loving, giving and joyful beings?

I have to believe this violence is not, actually, characteristic of the world, but rather a few bad people, who show the rest of the world the compassion, love and optimism the rest of humanity is capable of; who through their horrific acts and violence, help the rest of us to evolve to the fulness of our loving humanity.

Does that justify or bless the terror? No, but I am still ... still so inspired by the heroism, bravery and love that is so overwhelmingly evident when these tragedies occur. I hope each of us will see this is part of an evolution from our more universally depraved state, and while comforting our wounds and facing our fears, will at the same time rejoice in the overwhelming evidence of our goodness ...

Read Binta Niambi Brown's entire piece at the Huffington Post.

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