'Mixed Kids Are the Cutest' Isn't Cute?

Race Manners: Comments about the superior beauty of your biracial child aren't just weird -- they're troubling.

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(The Root) --

"I'm a Caucasian woman with a biracial child (her father is black). I live in a predominantly white community. Why is it that whenever people discover that I have a 'mixed' child, they always say things like, 'Oh, he/she must be so cute/gorgeous/adorable, those kids are always the best looking. You are so lucky.' 

I know they mean well, but it seems off to me, and maybe racist. Do they mean compared to 'real' black children? When a German and Italian or an Asian and Jewish person have a child, black people don't say, 'Mixed children like yours are always the best looking.' (Plus, it's not true -- not all black-white biracial kids are the 'best looking.')

Am I being overly sensitive by feeling there's something off about these comments? If not, what's the best way to respond?"

I chose this question for the first installment of Race Manners, The Root's new advice column on racial etiquette and ethics, because it hits close to home. Like your daughter, I'm biracial. Like you, my white mother has developed an acute sensitivity to the subtle ways prejudice and bigotry pop up in daily life. I should know. She calls me to file what I've deemed her "racism reports."

And let's be clear. Americans of all races say bizarre things to and about mixed people, who can inspire some of the most revealing remarks about our black-white baggage. Just think of the public debates about how MSNBC's Karen Finney, and even President Obama, should be allowed to identify.

But the comments in your question often come from a good place, and they're often said with a smile. When I was a child, adults loved to tell me that people paid "good money" for hair like mine (think 1980s-era perms on white women) and for tanning beds (again, it was the '80s and '90s) to achieve my skin color. Thus, the grown-up argument went, I should be happy (even if these trends didn't stop people from petting my curls as if I were an exotic poodle, nor did they give me the straight blond hair I envied, and it's not as if I was on the receiving end of the beauty-shop payments).

A friend got the biscuit analogy. Wait for it: God burned black people and undercooked white people, but removed her from the heavenly oven at the perfect moment, she was told.

Awkward. Well-intended. Poorly thought-through. A window into our shared cultural stuff about identity. These statements are all these things at once.

That's another reason I selected your question. When it comes to remarks that are so obviously dead-wrong to some of us, and so clearly innocuous to others, there's often little energy for or interest in breaking down the explanation that lies between "Ugh, so ignorant!" and "Oh, come on, stop being so sensitive."