‘Mixed Kids Are the Cutest’ Isn’t Cute?

Race Manners: Comments about the superior beauty of your biracial child aren’t just weird—they’re troubling.

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I'll try it out here.

You're right to be bothered by the remarks from the Biracial Babies Fan Club. Here's why: These people aren't pulling an arbitrary appreciation for almond-colored skin and curls from the ether. Instead—even if they are not aware of this—they're both reflecting and perpetuating troubling beliefs that are bigger than their individual tastes. Specifically, while "mixed kids are the cutest" is evenhanded on its face, treating both black and white (and all other ethnic groups) as inferior to your daughter, I hear it as anti-black.

As Marcia Dawkins, the author of Clearly Invisible: Racial Passing and the Color of Cultural Identity, told me, "The myth that mixed-race offspring are somehow better than nonmixed offspring is an example of 'hybrid vigor,' an evolutionary theory which states that the progeny of diverse varieties within a species tend to exhibit better physical and psychological characteristics than either one or both of the parents."

And just take a wild guess how this idea has popped up for black people. You got it: In order to demean and oppress African Americans, thought leaders throughout history, including the likes of Thomas Jefferson, have said that black-white mixed offspring are better, more attractive, smarter, etc., than "real" blacks and not as good or attractive or smart as "real" whites, Dawkins explains.

So alleging that mixed kids are the best of anything sounds different when you consider that we've long put a wholesale premium on all that's whiter and brighter.

Nowhere is that premium more stubbornly applied today than when it comes to the topic at the center of your question—beauty and attractiveness. In recent memory, we had to re-litigate the harms of colorism when Zoe Saldana was cast to play the lead in a Nina Simone biopic. Tamar Braxton and India.Arie have both been accused of bleaching skin—as if that would be a reasonable thing to do.

writer lamented in a personal essay for xoJane that she was sick and tired of being complimented for what black men viewed as her "mixed" or "exotic" (read: nonblack) physical features. (As far as I know, "you look a little black" is not a common line of praise among other groups.) Black girls still pick the white dolls in recreated Kenneth Clark experiments. Harlem moms can't get Barbie birthday decorations in the color of their little princesses. We treated rapper Kendrick Lamar like the department store that featured a model using a wheelchair​ in an ad campaign when he cast a dark-skinned woman as a music-video love interest.

Against this backdrop of painful beliefs that people of all colors buy into, yes, "Mixed kids are the cutest" should sound "off."

As the mom of a mixed kid, you signed up for more than just the task of venturing into the "ethnic" aisle of the drugstore and learning about leave-in conditioner. You took on the work of hearing things like this through the ears of your daughter, and you agreed to have a stake in addressing racism. The fact that these comments bothered you means you're on the job.

So if it's at all possible, you should explain everything I've said above to people who announce that your daughter is gorgeous based on racial pedigree alone. If you're shorter on time or familiarity, you could try a reminder that there's really no such thing as genetic purity in the first place ("Great news, if that's true, since most of us—including you—are mixed"). As an alternative, the old cocked-head, confused look, combined with "What makes you say that?" always puts the onus back on the speaker to think about what he or she is really saying.

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