20 Things Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Wishes He Knew at 30

You'll love these life lessons from the basketball legend. 

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Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (Stephen Dunn/Getty Images)

In a piece for Esquire, basketball legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar shares widely applicable pieces of advice that have little to do with the sport that made him famous.

From the commonsense (become financially literate) to the unexpected (do more yoga and watch more TV), he says he wishes that he could climb into a time machine and give his 30-year-old self these tips:

1. Be more outgoing. My shyness and introversion from those days still haunt me. Fans felt offended, reporters insulted. That was never my intention. When you're on the public stage every day of your life, people think that you crave attention. For me, it was the opposite. I loved to play basketball, and was tremendously gratified that so many fans appreciated my game. But when I was off the court, I felt uncomfortable with attention. I rarely partied or attended celebrity bashes. On the flights to games, I read history books. Basically, I was a secret nerd who just happened to also be good at basketball. Interacting with a lot of people was like taking someone deathly afraid of heights and dangling him over the balcony at the top of the Empire State Building. If I could, I'd tell that nerdy Kareem to suck it up, put down that book you're using as a shield, and, in the immortal words of Capt. Jean-Luc Picard (to prove my nerd cred), “Engage!”

2. Ask about family history. I wish I'd sat my parents down and asked them a lot more questions about our family history. I always thought there would be time and I kept putting it off because, at thirty, I was too involved in my own life to care that much about the past. I was so focused on making my parents proud of me that I didn't ask them some of the basic questions, like how they met, what their first date was like, and so forth. I wish that I had.

3. Become financially literate. “Dude, where's my money?” is the rallying cry of many ex-athletes who wonder what happened to all the big bucks they earned. Some suffer from unwise investments or crazy spending, and others from not paying close attention. I was part of the didn't-pay-attention group. I chose my financial manager, who I later discovered had no financial training, because a number of other athletes I knew were using him. That's typical athlete mentality in that we're used to trusting each other as a team, so we extend that trust to those associated with teammates. Consequently, I neglected to investigate his background or what qualified him to be a financial manager. He placed us in some real estate investments that went belly up and I came close to losing some serious coin. Hey, Kareem at 30: learn about finances and stay on top of where your money is at all times. As the saying goes, "Trust, but verify."

4. Play the piano. I took lessons as a kid but, like a lot of kids, didn't stick with them. Maybe I felt too much pressure. After all, my father had gone to the [Juilliard] School of Music and regularly jammed with some great jazz musicians. Looking back, I think playing piano would have given me a closer connection with my dad as well as given me another artistic outlet to better express myself. In 2002, I finally started to play and got pretty good at it. Not good enough that at parties people would chant for me to play "Piano Man," but good enough that I could read music and feel closer to my dad ...

Read more at Esquire.

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