No One Should Have to Live in Fear of Violence

In a piece for the Huffington Post, Valerie Jarrett, President Obama's senior adviser and chair of the White House Council on Women and Girls, praises the reauthorization and strengthening of the Violence Against Women Act. 

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In a piece for the Huffington Post, Valerie Jarrett, presidential senior adviser and chair of the White House Council on Women and Girls, praises the reauthorization and strengthening of the Violence Against Women Act.

Today, President Obama signed a bill that both strengthened and reauthorized the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA). Thanks to this bipartisan agreement, thousands of women and men across the country who are victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, dating violence and stalking will be able to access resources they need in their communities to help heal from their trauma. In addition, thousands of law enforcement officers will be better equipped to stop violence before it starts, and respond to calls of help when they are needed.

President Obama and Vice President Biden have steadfastly supported reauthorization -- it's what's right for our country. We thank Senators Patrick Leahy, Mike Crapo, and Patty Murray and Representatives Nancy Pelosi, Steny Hoyer and Gwen Moore for guiding this legislation to passage.

For the past 18 years, since Vice President Biden initially wrote the Act in 1994, VAWA has helped to decrease the rates of domestic violence across the country. Three years ago, our federal interagency group on violence against women began meeting to consider gaps in our country's response to this violence and make recommendations to Congress to fill those gaps. We are proud that many of these recommendations were included in the final bill. Now, we will be better equipped to recognize violence in its early stages, and help to reduce the number of domestic violence homicides.

Read Valerie Jarrett's entire piece at the Huffington Post.

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