Weird New Shorts and More: 5 Fun Facts About March Madness

While issues like poor graduation rates and unpaid players provide plenty of fodder for interrogation in college basketball, there's also a lot that's entertaining, writes Colorlines' Jamilah King.

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Brittney Griner of the Baylor Bears, 2012 NCAA Division 1 Women's Basketball Championship (Justin Edmonds/Getty Images)

While issues like poor graduation rates and unpaid players provide plenty of fodder for interrogation within college basketball, there's also a lot to be excited about, writes Colorlines' Jamilah King.

1. It's a family affair. If you grew up a basketball fan in the '90s, you'll immediately recognize the surnames of some of the top players in this year's men's championship. Michigan Wolverines guards Tim Hardaway Jr. and Glenn Robinson III are both the sons of retired NBA stars. UC Davis's Corey Hawkins's dad is former NBA guard Hershey. Duke Blue Devils senior Seth Curry is the little brother of Golden State Warrior Stephen and their dad, Dell, was a Charlotte Hornets sharp shooter ...

2. There is a player who has blocked more shots than Brittney. At 6-foot-8, Baylor University center Brittney Griner dominates the game with her dunks, 50-point games and shot blocks. Lots of blocks. In fact, with 736 under her belt, this senior holds the current record among women and men in the NCAA. But as it turns out, Griner isn't the first. Back in the 1970s, Old Dominion's Anne Donovan averaged almost six blocks per game and achieved a career record of 801 ...

3. Adidas is changing the look of the game. Literally.  You see those uniforms below? You don't like ‘em? Too bad. Adidas, one of the biggest sports apparel companies in the world, has been making some bold design moves lately and major teams are responding. Both Michigan and North Carolina State have already donned tone-on-tone uniforms this season. The sports giant is also unveiling sleeved, animal-striped unis soon. Cincinnati, Kansas, Notre Dame, Baylor, UCLA and Louisville fans, here's a sneak peek ...

Read Jamilah King's entire piece at Colorlines.

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