10 Reasons People of Color Should Care About Sequestration

Sophia Kerby, writing for the Center for American Progress, warns of the impact the budget cuts will have on vulnerable communities.

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In a piece for the Center for American Progress, Sophia Kerby warns of the impact the budget cuts will have on vulnerable communities.

1. Deep cuts to long-term unemployment benefits will disproportionately affect people of color. Extended federal unemployment benefits remain vulnerable under sequestration, and the long-term unemployed -- those out of work and searching for a new job for at least six months -- could lose almost 10 percent of their weekly jobless benefits if the sequester cuts go into effect next week ...

2. Workforce development programs that are vital to communities of color such as YouthBuild and Job Corps face significant cuts. YouthBuild, a program connecting low-income youth to education and training, could be cut by about 8 percent under sequestration. Coupled with previous federal appropriation cuts in fiscal year 2011 by 37 percent, the program could see about one-third of its federal funding cut between fiscal year 2010 and fiscal year 2013 ...

7. Federal education funding cuts will disproportionately hurt students of color. If the sequester goes into effect, nearly $3 billion would be cut in education alone, including cuts to financial aid for college students and to programs for our most vulnerable youth -- English language learners and those attending high-poverty, struggling schools -- impacting 9.3 million students. Such cuts will affect key programs that receive federally funded grants such as Education for Homeless Children and Youth and federal work study ...

Read Sophia Kerby's entire piece at the Center for American Progress.

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