Refuse to Be a Slave to the Scale

Erika Nicole Kendall explains at A Black Girl's Guide to Weight Loss why tying your self-esteem to an often meaningless number does more harm than good. 

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Erika Nicole Kendall explains at A Black Girl's Guide to Weight Loss why tying your self-esteem to an often meaningless number does more harm than good.

I spend a good half hour skimming through my feed reader and checking out different fitness-related tidbits and news out there. Today is no different.

I found an article -- I'm not going to say where -- that basically stated that it's a "great idea to check your weight every morning on the scale." Actually, it said this:

Step on the scale every morning. This will help you monitor even the smallest fluctuations in your weight. Another helpful strategy is trying on the same pair of jeans every morning. That way you can actually feel how your body changes on a day-to-day basis and when your jeans fit tighter than they should. Size can often be a more real measurement of fat than weight. Whatever you chose, keep tabs on your weight.

Let me tell you a personal story.

In May of 2008, I finally became fed up and decided to sign up for the 24hr gym located nearby. Inside, I found a beautiful workout center, a gorgeous bathroom, and a scale. When I first stepped on that scale, I was emotional. Teary eyed. I felt like that scale was a negative correlation to my worth ... the more I weigh, the less I am worth ...

Read Erika Nicole Kendall's entire piece at Black Girl's Guide to Weight Loss.

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