Ego Problem? Why Some Black Men Hate 'Scandal'

Clutch magazine's Kirsten West Savali wonders when the African-American men who "slut shame" Olivia Pope's character on the Shonda Rhimes series suddenly developed such strong morals. 

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Clutch magazine's Kirsten West Savali wonders when the African-American men who "slut shame" Olivia Pope's character on the Shonda Rhimes series suddenly developed such strong morals.

After calculating the results of a completely random, unscientific, social media poll, I have come to the conclusion that 76.21 percent of black men do not like Scandal ...

In all seriousness, I brushed aside the occasional acerbic comments that would come across my Facebook timeline and Twitter feed. The Sally Hemings and Thomas Jefferson jokes that black female Scandal watchers would nervously bat away, secretly wondering if their black, male friends were laughing with them or at them didn't even give me pause because I've long come to the conclusion that when it comes to inter-racial relationships, there are some black men who hold themselves to a different, hypocritical standard ...

I swiftly discard that exaggerated criticism because it is so obviously steeped in feelings of emasculation and instinctive powerlessness that it would take much longer than a sweep of social media to peel back all of the layers and address its core.

But these anti-Scandal black men are a wily bunch. Oh yes, they are. They realized that they couldn't continue to post pictures of Kim Kardashian on Monday, quote little Wayne talking about “bet that bitch look better red” on Tuesday, break down all the reasons why white women stay “#winning” on Wednesday, then complain about a black woman being in love with a white man on Thursday.

Read Kirsten West Savali's entire piece at Clutch magazine.

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