10 Slavery Facts You Won't Find in 'Django'

Colorlines editor Imara Jones goes beyond Quentin Tarantino's spaghetti Western to shed light on slavery's economic ramifications and how the free supply of African labor built America's foundations.

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In the last few weeks, Quentin Tarantino's spaghetti Western slave film, Django Unchained, has been dissected in almost every way possible. But Colorlines editor Imara Jones adds a number of tidbits that the average film buff might not know about the economic ramifications of that movie's slavery backdrop.

Though sadistic and macabre, the plain truth is that slavery was an unprecedented economic juggernaut whose impact is still lived by each of us daily. Consequently, here's my top-10 list of things everyone should know about the economic roots of slavery.

1) Slavery laid the foundation for the modern international economic system. The massive infrastructure required to move 8 to 10 million Africans halfway around the world built entire cities in England and France, such as Liverpool, Manchester and Bordeaux. It was key to London's emergence as a global capital of commerce, and spurred New York's rise as a center of finance. The industry to construct, fund, staff, and administer the thousands of ships which made close to 50,000 individual voyages was alone a herculean task. The international financial and distribution networks required to coordinate, maintain and profit from slavery set the framework for the modern global economy.

2) Africans' economic skills were a leading reason for their enslavement. Africans possessed unique expertise which Europeans required to make their colonial ventures successful. Africans knew how to grow and cultivate crops in tropical and semi-tropical climates. African rice growers, for instance, were captured in order to bring their agricultural knowledge to America's sea islands and those of the Caribbean. Many West African civilizations possessed goldsmiths and expert metal workers on a grand scale. These slaves were snatched to work in Spanish and Portuguese gold and silver mines throughout Central and South America. Contrary to the myth of unskilled labor, large numbers of Africans were anything but.

3) African know-how transformed slave economies into some of the wealthiest on the planet. The fruits of the slave trade funded the growth of global empires. The greatest source of wealth for imperial France was the "white gold" of sugar produced by Africans in Haiti. More riches flowed to Britain from the slave economy of Jamaica than all of the original American 13 colonies combined. Those resources underwrote the Industrial Revolution and vast improvements in Western Europe's economic infrastructure.

Read Imara Jones' entire piece at Colorlines.

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