One Mother of a Mentally Ill Child Speaks Out

Amid the shock after the Sandy Hook Elementary shooting, one parent pleads for greater understanding of how to deal with mental illness.

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Liza Long's son (Liza Long/The Anarchist Soccer Mom)

As many Americans are still reeling from the violent mass shooting at Connecticut's Sandy Hook Elementary School, one mother, Liza Long, wrote about her own experiences on her blog, the Anarchist Soccer Mom. Long's account of her son, Michael (not his real name), who is sweet and smart but also wildly violent and unpredictable, enlarges the picture of mental illness, and people like the alleged shooter behind Friday's massacre, 20-year-old Adam Lanza.

I live with a son who is mentally ill. I love my son. But he terrifies me.

A few weeks ago, Michael pulled a knife and threatened to kill me and then himself after I asked him to return his overdue library books. His 7 and 9 year old siblings knew the safety plan—they ran to the car and locked the doors before I even asked them to. I managed to get the knife from Michael, then methodically collected all the sharp objects in the house into a single Tupperware container that now travels with me. Through it all, he continued to scream insults at me and threaten to kill or hurt me.

That conflict ended with three burly police officers and a paramedic wrestling my son onto a gurney for an expensive ambulance ride to the local emergency room. The mental hospital didn't have any beds that day, and Michael calmed down nicely in the ER, so they sent us home with a prescription for Zyprexa and a follow-up visit with a local pediatric psychiatrist.

We still don't know what's wrong with Michael. Autism spectrum, ADHD, Oppositional Defiant or Intermittent Explosive Disorder have all been tossed around at various meetings with probation officers and social workers and counselors and teachers and school administrators. He's been on a slew of antipsychotic and mood altering pharmaceuticals, a Russian novel of behavioral plans. Nothing seems to work.

At the start of seventh grade, Michael was accepted to an accelerated program for highly gifted math and science students. His IQ is off the charts. When he's in a good mood, he will gladly bend your ear on subjects ranging from Greek mythology to the differences between Einsteinian and Newtonian physics to Doctor Who. He's in a good mood most of the time. But when he's not, watch out. And it's impossible to predict what will set him off ...

When I asked my son's social worker about my options, he said that the only thing I could do was to get Michael charged with a crime. “If he's back in the system, they'll create a paper trail,” he said. “That's the only way you're ever going to get anything done. No one will pay attention to you unless you've got charges.”

I don't believe my son belongs in jail. The chaotic environment exacerbates Michael's sensitivity to sensory stimuli and doesn't deal with the underlying pathology. But it seems like the United States is using prison as the solution of choice for mentally ill people.

Read more at the Anarchist Soccer Mom.

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