The Case for and Against More Guns

Atlantic blogger Ta-Nehisi Coates takes part in a spirited debate with fellow Atlantic writer Jeffrey Goldberg about the pros and cons of gun ownership. He decides that for him it would be a burden because, among other things, he'd be concerned about his own anger issues.

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In a blog post at the Atlantic, Ta-Nehisi Coates takes part in a spirited dialogue with fellow Atlantic writer Jeffrey Goldberg about the pros and cons of gun ownership. He decides that for him it would be a burden because, among other things, he would be concerned about his own anger issues and about how people might respond if they noticed his weapon.

... [Coates]: I think that last question gets to the heart of a difference. I actually wouldn't wish I had a gun. I've shot a rifle at camp once, but that's about it. If I had a gun, there is a good chance I would shoot myself, thus doing the active shooter's work for him (it's usually "him.") But the deeper question is, "If I were confronted with an active shooter, would I wish to have a gun and be trained in its use?" It's funny, but I still don't know that I would. I'm pretty clear that I am going to die one day. That moment will not be of my choosing, and it almost certainly will not be too my liking. But death happens. Life -- and living -- on the other hand are more under my control. And the fact is that I would actually rather die by shooting than live armed.

This is not mere cant. It is not enough to have a gun, anymore than it's enough to have a baby. It's a responsibility. I would have to orient myself to that fact. I'd have to be trained and I would have to, with some regularity, keep up my shooting skills. I would have to think about the weight I carried on my hip and think about how people might respond to me should they happen to notice. I would have to think about the cops and how I would interact with them, should we come into contact. I'd have to think about my own anger issues and remember that I can never be an position where I have a rage black-out. What I am saying is, if I were gun-owner, I would feel it to be really important that I be a responsible gun-owner, just like, when our kids were born, we both felt the need to be responsible parents. The difference is I like "living" as a parent. I accept the responsibility and rewards of parenting. I don't really want the responsibilities and rewards of gun-ownership. I guess I'd rather work on my swimming. And I think, given the concentration of guns in a smaller and smaller number of hands, there's some evidence that society agrees ...

Read Ta-Nehisi Coates' entire piece at the Atlantic. 

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