How Does America Break Its Gun Addiction?

At Clutch magazine, Britni Danielle reflects on what she argues is the real issue brought to light by the death of Kasandra Michelle Perkins at the hands of her pro-football-player boyfriend.

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Kansas City Chiefs linebacker Jovan Belcher (Jamie Squire/Getty Images Sport)

At Clutch magazine, Britni Danielle reflects on what she argues is the real issue brought to light by the death of Kasandra Michelle Perkins by her pro-football-player boyfriend.

By now you've probably heard about Kansas City Chiefs linebacker Jovan Belcher murdering his girlfriend, 22-year-old Kasandra Michelle Perkins, before taking his own life. And if you're like me you shook your head and commented on how completely tragic the whole event is. Another black woman killed at the hands of her lover, another child turned into an orphan, another man's life thrown away, and everyone else left to wonder why.

While many people struggle to sort out the details of Belcher and Perkins' relationship, others are engaging in another discussion, opening a very contentious debate -- yet again brought on by tragedy -- about when we're going to get serious about guns.

After Columbine, after VCU, after Tucson, and after Aurora, we all wondered if this time our nation would finally talk about our sick addiction to guns. But it didn't happen.

Even while inner cities like Chicago became just as dangerous as Middle Eastern war zones, and black and brown bodies stained the city streets, folks like me wondered if the chaotic nature of mass shootings or the amazingly tragic death of a kid walking home from the store would finally, finally jolt us into that much-needed conversation.

It didn't.

Read Brtini Danielle's entire piece at Clutch magazine.

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