When the Misguided Sexist Is a Friend

What's to be done when our buddies come out with statements about African-American women like, "All black women are crazy," XOJane columnist Danielle C. Belton wonders.

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When her friend said, "All black women are crazy," XOJane columnist Danielle C. Belton had to take a moment. This man, she writes, is surrounded by women and knows that blanket statements like that are completely untrue, but thinks it's comical to blurt out anyway. What's a girlfriend to do?

This is a man who is sad, and near impossible to deal with, when he can't see his wife. Who primarily works with women. Whose best friend is a woman. Whose career is bolstered by the influence, support, and management of women. Who is a "Mama's Boy." And who respects and values me despite being born of permanent tan and temperamental va-jay-jay.

He's simply insensitive in the most fratty, bone-headed way, often influenced by other men with checkered relationships with black women. But he's also the sort of guy who has spent most of his life winning at nearly everything he touches. He sometimes loses his empathy for not only women, but men who don't fit his worldview as well. Yet, when actually confronted with someone outside his circle, he's as understanding and caring as anyone would be.

His heart is politically correct, but his language is engendered, sexist, and sometimes rife with stereotypes.

Read Danielle C. Belton's entire piece at XOJane.

The Root aims to foster and advance conversations about issues relevant to the black Diaspora by presenting a variety of opinions from all perspectives, whether or not those opinions are shared by our editorial staff. 

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Danielle C. Belton is a Washington, D.C.-based satirist and blogger. Follow her on Twitter.

Like The Root on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter.