In Alabama, a Constitutional Change for the Worse?

In Alabama, blacks say a proposed antisegregation amendment may not be what it seems.

Posted:
 
runningschoolchildren102712575hc
Photodisc/Thinkstock

In the Alabama state constitution, there is a paragraph of "separate but equal" rhetoric regarding the school system, and surprisingly, blacks want to keep it there. According to the Associated Press, local African-American politicians say changing the wording to that of the proposed "Amendment 4" would be financially harmful to schools.

This time, black groups are leading the opposition to change. The Alabama Democratic Conference and the Alabama New South Alliance say the change, backed largely by white Republicans with a pro-business approach, looks like a "feel good" change but is not.

Amendment 4 would excise outdated language about poll taxes and separate schools that many consider racist. But the critics say the language being proposed as a substitute undermines funding for public education by reaffirming that there is no right to a public education at taxpayers' expense in Alabama.

"It is a wolf in sheep's clothing. It seems so good but is so bad," said black Democratic Sen. Hank Sanders of Selma, a New South founder.

Read more at the Associated Press.

Like The Root on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter. 

Comments
The Root encourages respectful debate and dialogue in our commenting community. To improve the commenting experience for all our readers we will be experimenting with some new formats over the next few weeks. During this transition period the comments section will be unavailable to users.

We apologize for any inconvenience and appreciate your continued support of The Root.

While we are experimenting, please feel free to leave feedback below about your past experiences commenting at The Root.
Must-See Family Attractions
July 29 2014 2:13 PM