Chris and Rihanna: There's Nothing Left to Say

Writing at Ebony, Jamilah Lemieux unpacks the teachable moments from the troubled couple's story, in a piece that she says she hoped she'd never have to write.

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Allison Joyce/Getty Images Entertainment; David McNew/Getty Images Entertainment

Writing at Ebony, Jamilah Lemieux unpacks the teachable moments from the troubled couple's story, in a piece that she says she hoped she'd never have to write.

[D]espite the looming inevitability of a Chrihanna reunion, I had really hoped that I had edited, written or read my last piece about the two and their relationship. Alas, that was not to be the case. In this era of oversharing and a culture of 'celebrities walking and breathing=news,' it wasn't enough for dude to just break up with his lady and quietly get back with his ex ... he had to explain to us that he was breaking up with his lady because of this paper thin non-admittance that he's dealing with his ex, as a friend.

Likeliest story ever.

Alas, in some capacity, Chris Brown and Rihanna have a significant presence in each other's lives once again. Or, they always did and now they feel enough time has passed since the beatdown (that you can't mention without being accused of being a manhater or robbing Robyn of all her agency or just bringing up old stuff) that they can be public with their friendship. Or something else all together.

Welp, it is what it is. In the past three years, the story of these two young people has provided some serious teachable moments around domestic violence, repentance (and the lackthereof), redemption and how abuse can be passed down generation to generation; we've also shed light on some horrifying cultural attitudes around victim blaming (if you told me before Grammy night '09 that so many people thought of West Indian women as fiesty-to-the-point-of-deserving-a-beatdown, I would not have believed you) and accountability.

Read Jamilah Lemieux's entire piece at Ebony.com.

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