Atheism: Why Not?

Michael Arceneaux writes in Ebony that more Americans are stepping away from religion, and it's not hard to see why when some religious leaders are using their idea of God to oust Obama.

Posted:
 
prayingpeople101412400hc
Digital Vision/Thinkstock

Recently, the Pew Research Center's Forum on Religion & Public Life revealed that at least one fifth of Americans aren't religiously affiliated, and Ebony's Michael Arceneaux says it's easy to see why. As controversies swirl around Protestantism, Arceneaux argues that while the country hasn't become "Bill Maher's wet dream" of a godless America, there is certainly change afoot. 

In a statement, Dr. Martin Luther King's niece, Dr. Alveda King wrote: "We fully intend to shift 25 percent of the black vote from the 2008 election by charging every voter to examine each candidate and vote for the one that supports their core belief in natural marriage."

In other words, they'd rather stick to questionable interpretations of about six references to homosexuality (as part of pagan rituals, and so on, but what does context matter to the fanatic?) in a religious book and use that as fuel to essentially help elect a man whose virtues and policies will gnaw away at the most significant principles extolled by Jesus throughout an entire half of the Bible.

Yes, teach President Obama about God's values by helping elect the guy who condemns the poor, wants to strip people of health care, and wants to overtax the working class in order to give other wealthy people like him an additional tax break that they don't need. Mind you, this is all over marriage -- a right determined by the state as opposed to Pastor Whoever anyway.

Combine the efforts of the God Said group with those of those patriarchal, child abuser-hiding leaders sitting in the Vatican and you can see why many people are looking to find God on their own terms. 

Read Michael Arceneaux's entire piece at Ebony.

The Root aims to foster and advance conversations about issues relevant to the black Diaspora by presenting a variety of opinions from all perspectives, whether or not those opinions are shared by our editorial staff. 

Like The Root on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter.

Comments
The Root encourages respectful debate and dialogue in our commenting community. To improve the commenting experience for all our readers we will be experimenting with some new formats over the next few weeks. During this transition period the comments section will be unavailable to users.

We apologize for any inconvenience and appreciate your continued support of The Root.

While we are experimenting, please feel free to leave feedback below about your past experiences commenting at The Root.