Students of Color Still Receiving Unequal Education

Across the nation, state and local governments are spending less on students of color than on whites, according to a new report.

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Across the nation, state and local governments are spending less on students of color than on whites, according to the Center for American Progress' latest education report, "Unequal Education: Federal Loophole Enables Lower Spending on Students of Color." Here are some highlights:

Since fully 35 percent of the nation's students of color attend school in either California or Texas, examining the relationship between the percent of students of color and dollars spent per student can bring the problem into sharper focus.

* In California schools serving 90 percent or more nonwhite students, per-pupil spending is $191 less than at all other schools, and $4,380 less than at schools serving 90 percent or more white students

* In Texas schools serving 90 percent or more nonwhite students, per-pupil spending is $514 less than at all other schools, and $911 less than at schools serving 90 percent or more white students

Just how big are these differences? In California the average high-minority school has 759 students. If an average-sized school got an extra $4,380 for every student, it would mean an extra $3.3 million a year. If that same school were to get a more modest boost of $191 per student to bring it in line with the majority of schools in the state, then it would get approximately $145,000 extra per year. Those extra dollars would pay the salaries of additional classroom teachers or buy any number of valuable educational inputs such as computers, guidance counselors, or teaching coaches.

In Texas the average high-minority school is 708 students; new teachers are paid $39,150 and veterans earn $47,100 annually. If an average high-minority school in the Lone Star state were to receive an extra $514 per-pupil funding -- enough to bring it up to the level of spending the rest of the schools in the state enjoy -- it would be able to pay the salaries of seven veteran teachers or nine new teachers.

Read more at the Center for American Progress.

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