How the US Can Help Impoverished Kids

Children's Defense Fund President Marian Wright Edelman discusses at the Huffington Post what Americans can do to stop poverty among children.

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As Americans face unemployment and underemployment, more and more children live in poverty. According to Children's Defense Fund President Marian Wright Edelman, writing at the Huffington Post, 16.4 million American children are poor, and 7.4 million are existing in extreme poverty. Edelman calls for a fight against this situation with a change that begins locally in American homes and communities.

A majority of public school students and more than three out of four Black and Hispanic children, who will be a majority of our child population by 2019, are unable to read or compute at grade level in the fourth or eighth grade and will be unprepared to succeed in our increasingly competitive global economy. Nearly eight million children are uninsured. More children were killed by guns in 2008-2009 than U.S. military personnel in both the Iraq and Afghanistan wars to date. A Black boy born in 2001 has a one in three chance of going to prison in his lifetime; a Latino boy a one in six chance of the same fate.

Millions of children are living hopeless, poverty- and violence-stricken lives in the war zones of our cities; in the educational deserts of our rural areas; in the moral deserts of our corrosive culture that saturates them with violent, materialistic, and individualistic messages; and in the leadership deserts of our political and economic life where greed and self interest trump the common good over and over. Millions of our children are being left behind without the most basic human supports they need to survive and thrive when parents alone cannot provide for them at a time of deep economic downturn, joblessness, and low wage jobs that place a ceiling on economic mobility for millions as America's dream dims.

Read Marian Wright Edelman's entire piece at the Huffington Post.

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