Be Thankful for Mr. Wrong

In his Essence column, Nathan Hale Williams advises women that a bad relationship can be a blessing (if you keep it moving).

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In his Essence column, Nathan Hale Williams advises women that a bad relationship can be a blessing (if you keep it moving):

One of the biggest obstacles to having a good dating life is trying to fit a square peg into a round hole. All too often, I see both women and men attempting to make a relationship work that is just not meant to be. Then many of my sister-friends get down and out when that relationship doesn’t work out. I think they should be thanking Mr. Wrong because he made room for Mr. Right.

Case in point, one my dear sister-friends was dating a guy in the fall 2011. A blind man could see that they weren’t right for each. Physically, the guy was extremely attractive, but his attributes stopped there. He was boring, not so bright and lacked a sense of humor. On the contrary, my sister-friend has an ebullient personality and is highly intelligent. Talking to her is like a sunny day while talking to him was like watching paint dry.

Following her inevitable break-up from, “Mr. Hell No,” she was sad for almost three weeks ...

Last week, she called and said those four words: “I found Mr. Right.” The honeymoon had continued. And, after seeing them together, I believed her. I’m exuberantly happy for her and I have a feeling it’s just going to get better. They’re already talking about marriage, which is a good sign from a guy. I always say, if a guy wants to marry you, he will talk about it rather quickly.

That string of bad relationships that didn’t work out was a blessing to my sister-friend. Had she been stuck in those dead end relationships, the ending of which seemed catastrophic at the time, she’d never had met her “M.R.”

Read Nathan Hale Williams' entire piece at Essence.

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