The Howard University Vigil for Trayvon Martin

"I am Trayvon Martin" is not an empty catchphrase for black students across America, says The Root DC blogger Lauren McEwen. Many of them realize that no matter how much they accomplish, they still fit shooter George Zimmerman's definition of "suspicious."

Posted:
 
prayer20vigil20for20travyvon20martin_mario20toma_400lh
Prayer vigil for Trayvon Martin in Florida (Mario Toma/Getty Images)

Checking in on a rally at Howard University, The Root DC blogger Lauren McEwen says that "I am Trayvon Martin" is not an empty catchphrase for black students across America. Many realize that no matter how much they accomplish, they still fit shooter George Zimmerman's definition of the word "suspicious."

A “modern-day lynching” is what they called it. That’s what some Howard University students have dubbed the killing of Trayvon Martin, the 17-year-old from Florida whose death at the hands of an overzealous neighborhood watch volunteer, who has yet to even see the inside of an interrogation room, has sparked a tremendous amount of outrage.

Last night students held a vigil organized by members of the Howard chapter of the NAACP and students from Howard Law School. More than 100 students gathered around the flagpole on the main campus -- the same flagpole where students met three years ago for the symbolic march to the Mall when President Obama was inaugurated -- to mourn the loss of a boy they never met, but all knew too well.

“I am Trayvon Martin” isn't an empty catchphrase for them. Black college students across America see their 17-year-old selves in those school photos of the baby-faced teenager.

This isn’t the latest chic political movement. It’s a stark reminder that no matter how high their GPAs are, how many degrees they get, how many plans they have, they still fit shooter George Zimmerman’s definition of the word “suspicious.”

Read Lauren McEwen's entire blog entry at The Root DC.

Like The Root on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter.   

Comments
The Root encourages respectful debate and dialogue in our commenting community. To improve the commenting experience for all our readers we will be experimenting with some new formats over the next few weeks. During this transition period the comments section will be unavailable to users.

We apologize for any inconvenience and appreciate your continued support of The Root.

While we are experimenting, please feel free to leave feedback below about your past experiences commenting at The Root.
Must-See Family Attractions
July 29 2014 2:13 PM