Why Line Up for 'Red Tails' and Not 'Pariah'?

Citing the quiet popularity of Pariah, Madame Noire blogger Charing Ball challenges George Lucas' conceit that black cinema will be jeopardized if Red Tails fails at the box office.

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In a blog entry at Madame Noire, Charing Ball questions George Lucas' argument that black cinema is at risk if his film Red Tails bombs at the box office. Not so, she says, citing the subdued popularity of Pariah, which is a black film.

... Interesting enough, Red Tails was created by the same guy who brought us Jar Jar Binks, the computer-animated character who appeared in the Star Wars prequels and which generated much controversy over its racially charged, Rastafarian mimicry. So why there is such a heavy emphasis on supporting Lucas’ Red Tails while genuine black films like Pariah are left to their own devices?

First off, I take issue with what is essentially has been a fear and race-based marketing campaign by Lucas to persuade moviegoers, particularly Black moviegoers, to see this film. We are told that if it would be the end of Black filmmaking as we know it. Never mind, if the film is interesting or compelling or even entertaining. We have a racial duty to unite to see this film or else we make Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. weep?

And never mind that Hollywood has been operating with the same M.O. for decades and decades. The industry will not likely change even if the film magically breaks box office records, which it will probably not. Why? Well stories told from the black perceptive have always had trouble finding dedicated audiences outside of the community. Point blank, the mainstream is less inclined to see films featuring black actors. And if we are to go on the long rationalized reason that Hollywood is a business, than we can be certain that Red Tails, even if it is moderately successful, will not inspire the business to take a chance on us.

Read Charing Ball's entire blog entry at Madame Noire.

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