Slow Recovery Means Poverty Will Keep Rising

Many of the "new poor" are the former middle class, according to a new study.

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Bronx food pantry (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

The Raw Story is reporting that nearly 10 million more Americans have fallen into poverty since the recession began in 2007-2009, and the number is expected to continue to rise because of the plodding pace of the recovery, according to a study released on Wednesday by Indiana University.

The study found the number of Americans living in poverty grew to 46.2 million in 2010, up 27 percent from 36.5 million in 2006, the year before the start of the recession. During the same period, the U.S. population increased 3.3 percent.

The study uses 2010 U.S. Census Bureau data released last year plus other government numbers. Poverty was expected to increase again in 2011 due to the slow pace of economic recovery, the high rate of unemployment, and the long duration of spells of unemployment, the study found. The study was produced out of the university’s School of Public and Environmental Affairs.

Although the official rate of unemployment is declining, this was largely due to many adults giving up looking for a job, the report said. The ratio of employed people to working-age adults has improved only slightly since the recession ended in June 2009, the study found ...

Job creation is more important than ever before in helping to speed up the economic recovery. We hope that efforts across the board will help get the nation back on track soon.

Read more at the Raw Story.

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