Police Raid Occupy Philly and Los Angeles Sites

More than 200 people were arrested in Los Angeles.

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Police raid Occupy L.A. site. (Getty)

In a united show of force, police raided the Occupy camps in Los Angeles and Philadelphia this morning. More than 200 protesters were arrested in Los Angeles. The Associated Press reports:

Dozens of officers in riot gear flooded down the steps of Los Angeles City Hall just after midnight and started dismantling the two-month-old camp two days after a deadline passed for campers to leave the park. Officers in helmets and wielding batons and guns with rubber bullets converged on the park from all directions with military precision and began making arrests after several orders were given to leave.

In Philadelphia, approximately 40 people were arrested after being evicted from the Occupy Philly site. Protesters marched through the streets, and some were arrested for failing to clear a street near City Hall.

The AP reports, "Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa raised public safety and health concerns in announcing plans for the eviction last week, while Philadelphia officials said protesters must clear their site to make room for a $50 million renovation project."

There's $50 million for a renovation project, but no money to help poor, unemployed and underemployed workers in Philadelphia? As for Los Angeles, it would be nice if the same level of concern for "public safety and health" were applied to the skid row area, where scores of homeless people have slept and continue to sleep on the streets of Los Angeles.

We suspect that those in power will do whatever it takes to dismantle the "Occupy movement." The arrest of protesters will only continue to fuel the fire.

Read more at Yahoo News.

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