OWS: Out of Zuccotti Park and Into the Streets

The movement may not occupy Zuccotti Park anymore, but it refuses to surrender its place in the national discourse, Eugene Robinson writes in his Washington Post column.

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Protester at Occupy Wall Street (Getty Images)

In his Washington Post column, Eugene Robinson writes that while Occupy Wall Street protesters may no longer occupy Zuccotti Park, they are still prominent in the national psyche. He says the movement has only just begun.

Demonstrators staged a “day of action” Thursday, following the eviction of their two-month-old encampment this week. The idea was, well, to occupy Wall Street in a literal sense -- to shut down the financial district, at least during the morning rush hour.

For the most part, it didn’t work. Entrances to some subway stations were blocked for a while, and traffic was more of a mess than usual. But police turned out in force, erecting barricades that kept protesters from getting anywhere near their main target, the New York Stock Exchange. Captains of commerce may have been hassled and inconvenienced, but they weren’t thwarted. 

There was some pushing and shoving, resulting in a few dozen arrests. Coordinated “day of action” protests were held in other cities. They did not change the world.

A big failure? No, quite the opposite.

Read Eugene Robinson's entire column at the Washington Post.

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