Diminishing Black Wealth

The middle class continues to lose ground as the public sector continues to slash jobs, the Rev. Al Sharpton writes in a blog entry at Huffington Post Black Voices.

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The black middle class continues to lose ground. (Thinkstock)

Even though the recession officially ended in June 2009, the black middle class is losing ground as the public sector continues to slash jobs, the Rev. Al Sharpton blogs at Huffington Post Black Voices. The public sector was the first rung out of poverty for most blacks, he writes.

In June of 2009, the economic recession was officially declared over. Despite the fact that millions remained unemployed, families were still foreclosed upon in record numbers and more children went hungry than most of us could have ever imagined, many had us buy into the notion that the worst was behind us and things were on an upward trajectory. Well, for the African American community, nothing could be further from the truth. In fact, Black layoffs have only skyrocketed since that time as the public sector - heavily comprised of a Black workforce - continues to slash jobs. And as a result, not only has Black wealth diminished, but so too has the existence of much of this nation's Black middle class itself. Black, White or Brown - that is a startling reality that should have all of us deeply concerned. 

According to a study released earlier this year by the Center for Labor Research and Education at the University of California, Blacks were 30% more likely than other workers to be employed in the public sector. And while the private sector has added 1.6 million jobs as reported in a recent New York Times piece, public employment has seen massive layoffs across the board. Whether it's teachers, firefighters, police officers, or any other form of municipal work, the public sector has been under attack from Wisconsin to NJ and everywhere in between.

Read the Rev. Al Sharpton’s entire blog post at Huffington Post Black Voices.

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