'No Child Left Behind' Reformed to Help States

President Obama is loosening the federal grip on public schools to give states breathing room, Lynne K. Varner writes in the Seattle Times.

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In her Seattle Times opinion column, Lynne K. Varner applauds President Barack Obama's education-reform measure, saying that it injects flexibility into "No Child Left Behind," which was too narrowly crafted by his Republican predecessor.

Do you know how to tell Election Day is drawing near? Conservatives step up their lament about the federal role in public education. 

Tea partyers tote miniature copies of the U.S. Constitution and ask -- rhetorically if you haven't guessed -- where the document references education.

Nowhere is the correct answer.

Syndicated columnist George Will spent a recent column arguing unconvincingly that President Obama's proposed waivers on requirements in the 2002 No Child Left Behind Act deepen "a federal takeover of education." 

To paraphrase another beloved conservative: There they go again.

George, the president isn't expanding the federal grip on public schools. He's loosening it by injecting flexibility into an education law crafted narrowly and too strictly by President George W. Bush, a Republican.

Read Lynne K. Varner's entire column at the Seattle Times.

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