Buying Black as a Cure for Black Unemployment

Black-owned firms tend to hire black employees because of persistent segregation in her city, writes Chicago Sun-Times columnist Laura S. Washington.

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Laura S. Washington, the Chicago Sun-Times columnist, writes that African Americans should start buying black in Chicago as a way to combat black unemployment numbers. Historically, black companies in the city have hired African-American workers.

Black folks are being hit harder than anyone in this monster recession. Nationally, the jobless rate among African Americans stands at 16.7 percent. However, there's a silver lining in Chicago’s persistent segregation -- black-owned firms tend to hire black employees. That's a winning argument for legacy black companies like Parker House Sausage, a Chicago food company in business for 90 years. Buying its products creates and sustains jobs. (Just take those pork patties hot links in moderation, the Fat Nag reminds.)

Channel 7 also notes Luster Products, another legacy firm that manufactures hair care supplies. That should be a no-brainer for black women, who spend millions annually tending to their bobs, weaves and locks.

Now's the time to pick up a subscription to the Chicago Defender. The weekly version of the 106-year-old newspaper is a shadow of its former historic self, but its parent company employs workers in Chicago, Detroit, Pittsburgh and Memphis.

Read Laura S. Washington's entire column at the Chicago Sun-Times.

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