Floyd Mayweather's Weak Punch for Charity

The Bottom Line: Plus, an MBA who moonlights as a gospel star, black virtual shoppers and more business news.

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Which begs the question: Wouldn't a man of such tremendous talent and ego want to stand in the center of the ring and show publicly that he is an undisputed world champion at philanthropy?

Follow Mayweather on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

Wall Street VIP Gets Her Gospel On

There is no doubt that Carla A. Harris knows how to render unto Caesar. At Morgan Stanley, she is a managing director providing investment advice in the Institutional Advisory Group and also leads the Emerging Managers Platform. Off the clock, she raises a joyful voice as a gospel singer who has performed at Carnegie Hall, has recorded three solo albums and is a member of two gospel choirs. Harris earned her magna cum laude in economics at Harvard University and her MBA from Harvard Business School. Follow her on Facebook and get her take on volunteering.

I Know It's Not Real, but I Still Want It

Anyone out there want to buy a virtual bridge? Oh. You already did. In June the mobile Internet company Mocospace polled 40,000 of its users. The company found out that while blacks were 36 percent of survey respondents, they made up 38 percent of virtual-goods buyers. Virtual goods are objects used in online games -- including weapons, shields, extra powers or money. The 18 percent of whites who responded bought 26 percent of the virtual goods, while Hispanics, who can be of any race, made up 31 percent of responders and 21 percent of buyers. View the Mocospace buyer infographic here.

BMW Shuffles Its Ad Agencies

BMW of North America hired Sanders\Wingo of Austin, Texas, for multicultural ads for the Mini. In doing so, BMW replaced another black-owned ad agency, Atlanta's Matlock Advertising and Public Relations, on the account. However, Matlock is still the agency of record for BMW's African-American market ads. Learn more about Top Blacks in the Ad World.

Black Farmers Want You!

It may be an impossibly difficult task, but there's a movement to inspire a new generation of black farmers to reverse their declining numbers and create alternative suppliers of healthy food to black consumers. In California the African American Farmers of California has created a 15-acre demonstration farm for newbies. Will Scott, the leader of the group, which has about 20 members in the fertile San Joaquin Valley, says it wants to train young people to become self-sufficient farmers.