Report: Recession Catastrophic for Children

New York Times columnist Charles Blow assesses a new report from the Children's Defense Fund that says the recession has had a catastrophic impact on children's well-being.

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Families with children struggle in the recession. (Getty Images)

In his New York Times column, Charles Blow breaks down a new report that says the recession has had a catastrophic impact on children's well-being.

One of the greatest casualties of the great recession may well be a decade of lost children.

According to "The State of America's Children 2011," a report issued last month by the Children's Defense Fund, the impact of the recession on children's well-being has been catastrophic.

Here is just a handful of the findings:

* The number of children living in poverty has increased by four million since 2000, and the number of children who fell into poverty between 2008 and 2009 was the largest single-year increase ever recorded.

* The number of homeless children in public schools increased 41 percent between the 2006-7 and 2008-9 school years.

* In 2009, an average of 15.6 million children received food stamps monthly, a 65 percent increase over 10 years.

* A majority of children in all racial groups and 79 percent or more of black and Hispanic children in public schools cannot read or do math at grade level in the fourth, eighth or 12th grades.

Read Charles Blow's complete column at the New York Times.

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