Got Milk? Drink's Vitamin D May Cut Diabetes Risk

Research suggests that the vitamin may help people most in danger of developing the disease.

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Vitamin D, found in milk, may reduce diabetes, study says. (George Doyle/Stockbyte)

A key nutrient found in milk may help reduce the risk of diabetes, the incidence of which among African Americans is almost twice that of whites.

Milk is fortified with vitamin D, a supplement that researchers at Tufts Medical Center in Boston have found may help prevent diabetes in people at high risk of developing it.

As WebMD.com reports:

The study does not prove cause and effect. "But if confirmed, there are huge implications because vitamin D is easy and inexpensive," Anastassios Pittas, MD, of Tufts Medical Center in Boston, tells WebMD.

In a study of over 2,000 people with prediabetes, the higher the level of vitamin D in the blood, the lower the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

Source: WebMD.com.

The study is preliminary, so don’t run out and stock up on vitamin D pills just yet.

And if you're one of those people for whom milk is a gastronomical nightmare, never fear. Fortified milk is not the only source of vitamin D. Cod liver oil is a great source, as are salmon and mackerel.

Get some sun, too. Sunlight exposure helps humans produce vitamin D naturally. All the more reason to head to the beach this summer.

Read more at WebMD.com.

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