D.C. EVENT: Explore the Black Generation Gap

The Root hosts a multigenerational panel of notables on June 6 to discuss differing views about racism.

Posted:
 
generationgap250

Are young blacks more optimistic about racism in America than their elders? Join The Root on June 6 in Washington, D.C., as we investigate the growing generational divide between today's African-American youths and their elders on matters of race. Our multigenerational panel of noted journalists and social analysts will discuss the Black Generation Gap, why it may be growing and what that means for future generations.

Moderated by The Root's managing editor, Joel Dreyfuss, a distinguished panel will explore the generational divide exposed by Ellis Cose in his new book The End of Anger (HarperCollins). The panel includes Cose; Eugene Robinson, political and cultural columnist for the Washington Post; Jamal Simmons, political analyst and TV commentator; Cheryl Contee, co-founder of Jack & Jill Politics; and Erica L. Williams, senior strategist for the Citizen Engagement Lab.

As more black youths break the racial barriers of generations past, will the lessons from the era of explicit racism and Jim Crow fall by the wayside? Are young African Americans naive about the impact of racism on today's society, or simply more liberated in their thinking? What is shaping the differing perceptions of racism across the generations? Join us as we ask these questions and more.  

EXPLORING THE BLACK GENERATION GAP
LOCATION: The Washington Post Building, 1150 15th Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20005
DATE: June 6, 2011
TIME: Doors open at 6 p.m.; panel begins promptly at 6:30 p.m.


*THE RSVP LIST FOR THIS EVENT IS CLOSED.*

Want to know more about the black generation gap? Read an excerpt of Cose's book on The Root.

Comments
The Root encourages respectful debate and dialogue in our commenting community. To improve the commenting experience for all our readers we will be experimenting with some new formats over the next few weeks. During this transition period the comments section will be unavailable to users.

We apologize for any inconvenience and appreciate your continued support of The Root.

While we are experimenting, please feel free to leave feedback below about your past experiences commenting at The Root.