Newark Man Denies Assassinating Malcolm X

The late Manning Marable's Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention raises the question of who really killed Malcolm X.

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malcolmx
Manning Marable's book raises questions about Malcolm X's assassination.

The Star-Ledger is reporting that a lawyer representing Al-Mustafa Shabazz today disputed an allegation that the 72-year-old Newark, N.J., man was the main assassin of Malcolm X in 1965, an accusation made in the late Manning Marable's book Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention. "I've spoken to him (Shabazz), and he categorically denies he was involved in the assassination of Malcolm X," said his attorney, J. Edward Waller.

In the book, it is being reported that Marable claims William Bradley, who many people over the years have placed at the shooting of Malcolm X, is named as the chief assassin of Malcolm X

On Saturday, Carolyn Shabazz said her husband did not have any association with the death of the controversial black leader 46 years ago. He was not available to speak at the time, and today Waller said that he was now speaking for the couple. "There's nothing that ties him with the death of Malcolm X directly or indirectly," Waller said. "There's nothing to support this."

In his book, Marable wrote extensively about Newark Mosque 25 and its alleged role in the conspiracy to assassinate Malcolm X. According to historian Abdur-Rahman Muhammad, who worked with Marable and interviewed many of the members of Newark's Muslim community, the involvement of Mosque 25 had been "an open secret" for years.

This "open secret" in the black community is now open to the world. Sadly, Marable, who passed away on Friday, is not here to defend his work. As he did in life, he is stirring the pot in death, making people think, defend and ask questions. Many believed that Malcolm X was assassinated by members of the Nation of Islam, and Marable has done the research to turn this "conspiracy theory" from fiction to fact. In an interview with the Star-Ledger last year, Marable stated, "This isn’t a court of law. Rather, it's how a historian pieces together evidence. You make judgments about people based on the totality of their lives."

Read more at NJ.com.

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