Law Student Complains of Too Much Black Representation on Campus

Blacks make up only 5.8 percent of the student body at Indiana University's law school, but one student thinks that's too much.

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Indiana University Law School

Legal blog Above the Law recently got ahold of an anonymous email from an Indiana University who felt there were too many black men in the school's public materials.

In the email, the student explained that the banners placed around the school were not a fair representation of the institution. "We should support diversity, not just African-American males," the student wrote. "The portraits and paintings in the law school sing the same song. It is a shame that the only place many groups see representation at the law school is with their reflection in the bathroom mirrors."

The writer went on to suggest that the school's career center -- run by black women -- was biased toward black students. "It is a pervasive opinion that the OPD offers more assistance to members of certain groups. Is this how our institution is to be regarded?" The writer urged administrators, students and teachers to think about what was written, and went on to sign the email as "The Invisible Man."

This anonymous writer, who calls him or herself "bold" for crying reverse racism, could not be more cowardly. If you feel so strongly about something and feel justified, then why are you hiding behind an alias? The word "diversity" was thrown around countless times throughout the email, yet not once was a race other than African American mentioned. Clearly the author's desperate cry for diversity simply meant "more white people" or, better yet, "no black people, please." If your biggest concern in law school is a banner with a black man on it, you clearly have way too much time on your hands. 

Read more at Jezebel.

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