An Appreciation of Lucille Clifton

Praise for the poet of deceptive simplicity.

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The poet Lucille Clifton, one of the most distinct voices of the past forty years, and the former Poet Laureate of the State of Maryland (1979-1985), died on Saturday, Feb. 13, 2010, in Baltimore.

Lucille Clifton was born Thelma Lucille Sayles on June 27, 1936, in a small town called Depew, NY, to literary parents who wrote poems and stories. She attended Howard University from 1953 to1955, whe re she met the Black Arts poet LeRoi Jones (later Amiri Baraka) but returned to upstate New York. She married Fred James Clifton in 1958. She joined Coppin State College in Baltimore in 1971 as poet-in residence. After her husband died in 1984, Clifton moved to take a position as professor of literature and creative writing at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She returned to Maryland in 1990 and had been Distinguished Professor of Humanities at St. Mary’s College of Maryland since 1991.

Lucille Clifton’s poetry is generally described by scholars and fellow poets as concise, lean, spare, direct, unadorned, economical, deceptively simple, deceptively slight, and deceptively evanescent. Her deceit is in her brevity. Like Emily Dickinson, to whom she is often compared in style, though not subject, she astonishes with very few—and often very short—lines. Clifton refuses capital letters and often refuses punctuation. Her words sit quietly on the page even while the meanings of the words pounce on the unsuspecting reader. Her distinctive style rarely changed from the voice she established in her first published book of poetry, Good Times (1969), which was lauded by the New York Times as one of the year’s ten best books. Consider the last two stanzas of “Admonitions”:

girls

first time a white man

opens his fly

like a good thing

we’ll just laugh

laugh real loud my

black women

children

when they ask you

why is your mama so funny

say

she is a poet

she don’t have no sense

Clifton’s use of short lines and halting diction renders standard forms of punctuation unnecessary. Read out loud, the voice of “Admonitions” is unmistakably the voice of a black woman—a woman who despite the last line clearly has a great deal of sense. Unlike her literary forebear, the poet Countee Cullen (1903-1946), who famously wanted to be known as a poet, not a Negro poet, Lucille Clifton’s voice nearly always identifies itself as black, female, and quite often, a mother. There are very few abstractions in Clifton’s work.

Clifton’s more than a dozen collections of poetry after Good Times include Good News About the Earth (1972), An Ordinary Woman (1974), Two Headed Woman (1980), and Next: New Poems (1987). Next and her collection Good Woman: Poems and a Memoir 1969-1980 (1987) were nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. In 1991 she published Quilting: Poems 1987-1990, which the New York Times called “angry, prophetic, compassionate, shrewd, sensuous, vulnerable, funny.” Blessing The Boats: New and Collected Poems 1988-2000 (2000) won her a National Book Award.

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