Blacks Lose Majority in Harlem

Available property has brought a population shift to Harlem...

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The New York Times has an interesting article today on the population shift in Harlem

For nearly a century, Harlem has been synonymous with black urban America. Given its magnetic and growing appeal to younger black professionals and its historic residential enclaves and cultural institutions, the neighborhood’s reputation as the capital of black America seems unlikely to change soon.

But the neighborhood is in the midst of a profound and accelerating shift. In greater Harlem, which runs river to river, and from East 96th Street and West 106th Street to West 155th Street, blacks are no longer a majority of the population — a shift that actually occurred a decade ago, but was largely overlooked.

By 2008, their share had declined to 4 in 10 residents. Since 2000, Harlem’s population has already grown more than in any decade since the 1940s, to 126,000 from 109,000, but its black population — about 77,000 in central Harlem and about twice that in greater Harlem — is smaller than at any time since the 1920s.

Keep reading on the shift over at The New York Times

In light of this shift, do you think it's important to preserve Harlem as a Black mecca or should a focus be on establishing new communities elsewhere?

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Sept. 19 2014 8:34 AM