The soon-to-be-opened Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture is seen Sept. 1, 2016, in Washington, D.C. The museum was established by an act of Congress in 2003. It is the only national museum devoted exclusively to the documentation of African-American life, history and culture.
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The day has finally come for the new National Museum of African American History and Culture to open.

On Sept. 24, the doors to the museum will open to the public. A few of our staff members had the opportunity to visit the museum Thursday on its media day, and trust us, you will not be disappointed.

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The museum includes 12 exhibits, starting from before slavery to the present day. Some parts are devastating, some moving and others breathtaking. All of it is a proud representation of our deep-rooted history and our incredibly admirable culture.

It features personal items of some of the most notable African Americans of all time, such as Harriet Tubman, Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King Jr., Oprah Winfrey, Michael Jackson and Gabby Douglas, as well as so much more.

Because of the highly anticipated crowds, tickets must be acquired before entry. They are now available for reservation on the museum's website.

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The day we have been preparing ourselves for is finally here. Be sure to take advantage, because you certainly won't regret it.

Ornate exterior walls of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture, opening to the public Sept. 24, 2016
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Outside the Oprah Winfrey Theater inside the museum
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Books written by Charles W. Chesnutt and Paul-Laurence Dunbar
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Wooden knife and fork belonging to Harriet Tubman
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A dress of Rosa Parks
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Black Panther button
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After the march from Selma to Montgomery in Alabama, Martin Luther King Jr. used this tub to soak his feet.
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A guard tower
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Wooden Afro pick
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Dress worn by Michelle Obama
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Display of Ebony magazines
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Leotard belonging to Olympian Gabby Douglas
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“Portrait of an African” by Albrecht Dürer
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Joe Louis’ boxing gloves
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Jackie Robinson’s bat and jersey
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Statues of Venus and Serena Williams
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Michael Jordan’s Chicago Bulls jersey and the Wheaties cereal box on which he appeared
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Statue depicting iconic moment during the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City when U.S. runners Tommie Smith and John Carlos raised their fists while on the medal stand
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Desks from the Hope School, which educated rural African-American children in Pomaria, S.C., in the early to mid-20th century
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Colin Powell’s military uniform
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Some African-American recipients of the Medal of Honor, the nation’s highest military honor
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Pastor’s chair from the First African Methodist Church of Los Angeles
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Rastafarian crown
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Description of the trans-Atlantic slave trade
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Door-knocker earrings
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Sculpture made by Jefferson Pinder from wood salvaged from President Barack Obama’s 2009 inaugural platform
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Jermaine Jackson’s costume from 1971
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Little Richard’s jacket
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Lena Horne’s earrings
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Whitney Houston’s 1987 American Music Award
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Grand Wizzard Theodore’s turntables
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Flavor Flav’s clock
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Playbill for A Raisin in the Sun
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Ruby Dee and Ossie Davis
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Statue of Thomas Jefferson
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A whip enclosed in a glass case under the quote, “After the weighing follow the whippings.” —Solomon Northup
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“Ashley’s Sack,” a bag given to a young girl named Ashley by her mother before the girl was sold away
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Harriet Tubman’s lace shawl
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Slave cabin
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Minstrel character
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